Celebrating Success and Exciting Updates: Here’s What’s New at CSHA

Dear Affiliates, Members, Partners, Funders, and CSHA Community:

We are excited to share an update with you about CSHA’s search for a new executive director and the structure of our organization during this transition period. We have contracted with an executive search firm and have posted our formal job announcement online at CSHA’s website. Our hope is to secure a new executive director by early 2018.

CSHA’s Leadership Team is currently overseeing day-to-day management of the organization during this transition period, with input and guidance from the staff and Board. Amy Manta-Ranger, Director of Programs, has graciously accepted the role of Acting Executive Director and is supported by other members of the leadership team, including Lisa Eisenberg, Policy Director; Dawn Valadez, Development Director; and Maria Salzano, Director of Operations. Additional consultation support is provided by Serena Clayton, former CSHA Executive Director, and Kristin Andersen, former CSHA Associate Director.
 
With the support and combined experience of current and former staff, Board members, and an executive search firm, we are well-positioned to quickly identify and hire a new executive director. Despite this transition, our work continues, and our commitment to strengthen the school-based health care movement in California is unwavering.

We’re also excited to share the news that the number of SBHCs in California has grown to 257, and we are able to provide more technical assistance to the field than ever before! We are working with partners to expand region-specific training through convenings in the Central Valley and Los Angeles County. Register today for the LA County School Health Centers Conference on October 30!

Work is underway to develop new sustainability toolkits for the field to help address the need for long-term SBHC funding. We are exploring new ways to integrate the best practices in substance use prevention and trauma-informed approaches across the state. Through our Fight Fund project, funded by The California Endowment, we are providing training and technical assistance to SBHCs so they can better provide information about schools and SBHCs as sanctuary sites for undocumented students and families.
 
Finally, we are excited to share that planning for the 2018 California School-Based Health Conference is underway. We’re already getting amazing workshop proposals, and we anticipate record attendance of 500 providers, educators, and advocates to join us in Sacramento on May 17-18, 2018Submit your workshop proposal today!
 
Thank you for your commitment to put healthcare where kids are—in schools!  We’d love to hear from you if you have any questions or suggestions. 

On behalf of the staff and Board, thank you,

Amy-signature

Amy Manta-Ranger
Acting Executive Director

P.S. Become a member or renew your membership today to secure your exclusive members-only early bird registration rate for our 2018 California School-Based Health Conference in Sacramento on May 17-18, 2018.

New Opportunities for CSHA Leadership

The Board and staff of the California School-Based Health Alliance (CSHA) are proud of the work we have done in the past year to grow the school-based health care movement across the state. In a time of great uncertainty about health care, the Alliance has worked to secure its place as a leader in the field. We will continue to pursue opportunities to strengthen the Alliance and deepen our commitment to the health and success of California’s children.

Today we announce that Judy Appel, Executive Director, has resigned to pursue an unexpected opportunity to run for California State Assembly (District 15). The recent announcement by Assemblymember Tony Thurmond to run for California State Superintendent of Public Instruction created the chance for Judy to continue her service to her community in a new capacity: the State Assembly. Judy remains committed to the mission of CSHA, and the Board and staff applaud her dedication to public service.

We recognize the need for a full-time, permanent executive director to lead CSHA and build on the momentum and success of the school-based health care movement. As we initiate a nationwide search for a new executive director, the Board and staff are developing an interim plan that will ensure the continued, smooth operation of the Alliance.

CSHA continues to play a pivotal role in putting health care where kids are—in schools. The commitment of our members, funders, and the communities we serve continues to be the bedrock that allows us to make exciting and important changes that drive the school-based health care movement forward and improve the health and success of children across California.

Fresno OKs Six New SBHCs

The Fresno Unified School District Board of Supervisors on February 8, 2017, approved six new school-based health centers (SBHCs) to benefit nearly 7,000 students.

Fresno Unified School DistrictStudents “benefit from having quality health care, which keeps them in school longer, makes them more successful, and immediately impacts their learning,” Acting Fresno Unified Superintendent Bob Nelson said at a press event announcing the plans to build the new SBHCs.

Fresno opened its first school-based health center at Gaston Middle School in 2014. Kaiser Permanente Northern California Community Benefit provided generous support to facilitate the planning of the new SBHCs in partnership with Fresno Unified. The six new sites will be operated in partnership with Clinica Sierra Vista and Valley Children’s Healthcare and are planned for Addams and Bakman elementary schools; Tehipite and Sequoia middle schools; and Duncan Polytechnic and Sunnyside high schools. 

Fresno Unified School DistrictCalifornia School-Based Health Alliance Project Director Salina Mendoza provided Fresno Unified with background on the values of school-based health care, and partnered with Kaiser Permanente, Clinica Sierra Vista, and Valley Children’s Healthcare on planning the new sites.

Valley Children’s Healthcare CEO Todd Suntrapak outlined the fiscal and public health benefits of putting health care directly into Fresno’s schools:

Fresno Unified School District“Last year, we took care of 37,599 kids that were located within three miles of each one of these six clinics. We believe in partnering with Clinica Sierra Vista and Fresno Unified, we won’t just be committed to addressing episodic acute health care needs of kids, but we will be able to … improve and sustain the health and wellbeing of kids.”

See more in a video of the press event and on the Fresno Bee website.

School Health Care Remains Popular in CA

School-based health care is growing in California and providing more services and health care access for students.  There are now 246 school-based health centers (SBHCs) providing high-quality health care to students. Across California, more than 265,000 students attend a school that has a health center, and many more have access to other types of school health services.

This is more than double the number a decade ago. Of the 246 SBHCs, 159 offer mental health care, 69 offer dental treatment, and 129 offer youth engagement programs that keep kids engaged in school and thinking about their future.

SBHCs are so popular because they offer convenient health care for kids in a setting families already know and trust.

Students who utilize SBHCs are less likely to go to the emergency room or be hospitalized, keeping costs down. SBHCs also improve attendance, reduce dropout rates, improve school climate, and support students’ academic achievement. Schools and school districts partner with health service providers to finance SBHCs.

More Information on California’s SBHCs

There are 246 SBHCs serving more than 265,000 students across California. SBHCs are usually located directly on a school campus and provide primary care like any health clinic. Staff vary in size, and typically includes nurse practitioners, nurses, mental health providers, as well as part-time physicians and medical students. Services are provided at no or low cost. No one is refused service for inability to pay.

Services Offered

Service Number Percentage
Medical 213
86%
Health Education 175 71%
Mental Health
159 64%
Reproductive Health – Screening & Education
150 60%
Reproductive Health – Clinical Care 140 56%
Youth Engagement 129 52%
Dental Prevention 123
50%
Dental Treatment
69
28%

 

Sponsoring Org Types

Type of Sponsoring Organization Number Percentage
Community Clinic 137 57%
School District 65 27%
Local Health Department 11 5%
Hospital 9 4%
Nonprofit Organization 7 2%
Mental Health Agency 8 3%
Tribal Government 1 .5%
Other 4 1.5%

 

Onsite SBHC Location Level 

School Level Number Percentage
High School  120  49%
Elementary School  60  24%
Middle School  27  11%
Other (school-linked/mobile/combined levels)  39  16%

 

 

State to Change School Medi-Cal Billing Program

We have very exciting news to share about the “free care rule” reversal that reopens a critical avenue of reimbursement for Local Education Agency (LEA) school health providers.

Learn More About the Free Care Rule

The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) announced on August 29 that changes to the provider manual for the LEA Billing Option Program will reflect the most recent policy direction from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regarding “free care.” The draft changes to the manual are available for review and should be officially published later in September.

This exciting anticipated change to the LEA Billing Option program ensures that Medi-Cal may reimburse LEA providers for services provided to Medi-Cal eligible students, even if they are not in special education.

We hope that everyone providing health services in schools will learn about this opportunity to draw down more revenue to create robust school health systems that include both school districts and community providers.

You can learn more about the “free care” policy, the LEA Billing Option program, and CMS’s policy change on our Free Care Rule page. We have been working closely with DHCS, LEAs, the California School Nurses Organization, and other advocates to make sure that our state makes changes to the LEA program to strengthen school-based health care.

Judy Appel Named Executive Director

Judy AppelThe California School-Based Health Alliance Board of Directors has named Judy Appel as the new executive director to lead our organization.

Judy starts on September 19 and is excited to join us at a moment of incredible opportunity to build more support for school-based health care. Our Board of Directors chose Judy after a comprehensive search process because of her strong experience leading a regional nonprofit to statewide and national prominence.

Judy has served since 2005 as the executive director of Our Family Coalition, which is based in the Bay Area and advances equity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) families with children through support, education, and advocacy.

She has led policy victories for Our Family Coalition, including the Welcoming and Inclusive Schools Program that guides schools to create more welcoming environments for LGBTQ families, and LGBTQ inclusion in the new history-social science curriculum framework recently adopted by the State Board of Education. She is also involved in statewide policy efforts on ending the school-to-prison pipeline.

Judy serves on the Board of Education for the Berkeley Unified School District, where she oversees a complex budget of $135 million; guides policy direction for instruction and programs; supports physical and mental health services for students; and leads Board efforts to implement restorative justice, social emotional learning, and trauma-informed practices at school sites.

In addition, she is involved with numerous initiatives aimed at improving education and health equity for all students, including the Restorative Practices Advisory Committee, the Berkeley Unified 2020 Vision Leadership Team, and the Fix School Discipline Policy Coalition.

We are pleased to welcome Judy as we begin a new phase of growth for the California School-Based Health Alliance and school-based health care in California!

Health Access Grows for Students in CA

Hiram Johnson SBHC Opening

Students and faculty join CA Rep. Doris Matsui in celebrating the opening of the Hiram Johnson SBHC in Sacramento in March 2015.

School-based health care is growing in California and providing more services and health care access for students.  There are now 243 school-based health centers (SBHCs) providing high-quality health care to students. Across California, more than 257,000 students attend a school that has a health center, and many more have access to other types of school health services.

This is more than double the number a decade ago. Of the 243 SBHCs, 150 offer mental health care, 66 offer dental treatment, and 124 offer youth engagement programs that keep kids engaged in school and thinking about their future.

SBHCs are so popular because they offer convenient health care for kids in a setting families already know and trust.

Students who utilize SBHCs are less likely to go to the emergency room or be hospitalized, keeping costs down. SBHCs also improve attendance, reduce dropout rates, improve school climate, and support students’ academic achievement. Schools and school districts partner with health service providers to finance SBHCs.

More Information on California’s SBHCs

There are 243 SBHCs serving 257,000 students across California. SBHCs are usually located directly on a school campus and provide primary care like any health clinic. Staff vary in size, and typically includes nurse practitioners, nurses, mental health providers, as well as part-time physicians and medical students. Services are provided at no or low cost. No one is refused service for inability to pay.

Services Offered

Service Number Percentage
Medical 209
86%
Health Education 172 71%
Mental Health
150 62%
Reproductive Health – Screening & Education
146 60%
Reproductive Health – Clinical Care 136 56%
Youth Engagement 124
51%
Dental Prevention 118
49%
Dental Treatment
66
27%

 

Sponsoring Org Types

Type of Sponsoring Organization Number Percentage
Community Clinic 131 54% 
School District 69 28% 
Local Health Department 11 5%
Hospital 10
4%
Nonprofit Organization 8
3%
Mental Health Agency 8
3%
University,  Including Medical Center 1
.4%
Tribal Government 1 .4%
Other 4 2%

 

Onsite SBHC Location Level 

School Level Number Percentage
High School 115 47%
Elementary School 62 26%
Middle School 26 11%
Other (school-linked/mobile/combined levels) 40 16%

 

 

AG’s Report Raises Alarm on Poor Elementary School Attendance

Attorney General Kamala Harris raises awareness about poor elementary school attendance in California and calls for action.

Attorney General Truancy Report #EveryKidCountsWhen students are chronically absent from elementary school, they fall behind academically, they are less likely to graduate from high school, and they are more likely to be unemployed and on public assistance. Putting kids on a path to success requires attention to student attendance, particularly in the early years. Research shows that early school attendance is a critical building block to a child’s success.

Read more about the causes of chronic absence.

Attorney General Kamala D. Harris has made reducing elementary school truancy and chronic absence a priority. As part of this effort, the Attorney General released an annual report, In School + On Track, to disseminate effective practices for reducing student absences, to track changes in statewide attendance rates, to raise awareness about the critical importance of elementary school attendance, and to call others to action.

The 2015 report includes new and updated data on the still alarming rates of elementary school truancy and chronic absence across the state.

  • More than 1 in 5 elementary school students in California are truant based on data from the California Department of Education.
  • An estimate of 8% of elementary school students in California are chronically absent. That means over 230,000 of our youngest students are already at risk of falling behind in school.
  • Data also shows that there are disproportionately high rates of absenteeism and suspensions for students of color, low-income, homeless, foster youth and special education students.

There is also a positive trend across California: increased attention and more concerted efforts to improve elementary school attendance. The 2015 report highlights some of the districts and counties engaged in this important work.

The California School-Based Health Alliance applauds the Attorney General for continuing to draw attention to the issue of chronic absence in California. We know SBHCs make a huge difference at the schools they serve in addressing the underlying health issues that may impact attendance. Check out some of the ways that SBHCs are making a difference.

“School-based health providers across the state have firsthand experience with both the causes and consequences of chronic absence. Economic inequities prevent many children from getting the health, mental health, and dental care they need, which leads to untreated health problems that keep kids out of class. School-based health centers are an important part of a comprehensive solution to improving attendance, advancing equity, and closing the achievement gap.” 
– Serena Clayton, Ph.D., Executive Director, the California School-Based Health Alliance

$2 Million Grant to Help Address Trauma in Oakland

Serena-Clayton-Fred-Blackwell-Oakland-071415

Serena Clayton, Executive Director of CSHA, and Fred Blackwell, CEO of The San Francisco Foundation, at the grant announcement in Oakland.

The California School-Based Health Alliance (CSHA) received a $2 million grant July 14 from The San Francisco Foundation to support trauma-informed care in 15 school-based health centers in Oakland Public Schools.

CSHA is one of 17 Oakland-based nonprofit community-based organizations receiving funding as part of a $34 million gift made to The San Francisco Foundation from an anonymous donor in 2015. Read more about the anonymous gift.

“For young people who grow up in communities where violence and instability are a way of life, trauma can have a profound impact on motivation, school performance, and life options. Trauma results from, and contributes to, the glaring social inequities that face our communities,” said Dr. Serena Clayton, Executive Director of CSHA.

“We are grateful to the San Francisco Foundation and its donor for their confidence in us and in the potential of school-based health centers to achieve transformational change in the lives of young people,” said Clayton.

The grant will enable CSHA to build supportive environments and services to help students cope with high levels of trauma. CSHA will be engaging school-based health centers in implementing schoolwide screenings, support groups, trauma-informed care, and support for teachers.

Click to expand map

Click to expand a map of the impact this grant will have on Oakland Schools.

School-based health centers bring medical and mental health professionals directly on to school campuses where they are in close proximity to both students and school staff. This proximity leads to unique opportunities for teachers, students, families, and medical and mental health providers to work together.

CSHA will share lessons learned throughout California and nationally.

CSHA’s partners include the following:

Seven Supporting Agencies

East Bay Agency for Children
East Bay Asian Youth Center
Fred Finch Youth Center
La Clinica de la Raza
LifeLong Medical Care
Native American Health Center
UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital of Oakland

Fifteen School-Based Health Centers

Frick Middle School-Based Health Center
Shop 55 Wellness Center-Oakland High School
Rising Harte Wellness Center-Bret Harte Middle School
Fremont High School Tiger Clinic
Havenscourt Health Center-Coliseum College Preparatory Academy
Hawthorne Health Center-Urban Promise Academy
Roosevelt Middle School Health Center
TechniClinic-Oakland Technical High School
Elmhurst/Alliance Middle School Wellness Center
West Oakland Middle School Health Center
Madison Park Business and Art Academy Health Center
Seven Generations School-Based Health Center-Skyline High School
Seven Generations School-Based Health Center-United for Success/Life Academy
Chappell Hayes Health Center-McClymonds High School
Youth Uprising/Castlemont Health Center-Castlemont High School

Rural SBHCs Increasing in Central Valley

This article appeared in California Healthline on April 13, 2015.

By Alice Daniel, California Healthline Regional Correspondent

LIVINGSTON — Salina Mendoza grew up in a tiny unincorporated community called Oro Loma on the west side of the Central Valley. Her parents were farm workers and resources were scarce, especially when it came to medical care. It wasn’t just that the doctor was a 30-minute drive away in Firebaugh; going there meant losing a day’s work.

“For me, it was growing up in a place where access was always an issue,” Mendoza said. “My dad had the only vehicle so that meant if we ever had to go to the doctor, he couldn’t go to work that day.”

And if he didn’t go to work, he wouldn’t get paid. “You grow up and you really don’t go to the doctor,” said Mendoza, who is now the Central Valley program manager for the California School-Based Health Alliance.

Merced County’s First On-Site School Clinic

It’s a situation Ralph Calderon sees every day. He’s the principal of Livingston High School in this Central Valley town of 14,000 in Merced County. He said more than 90% of his students come from low-income families, typically from homes where both parents work, yet the median family income is below $40,000. Employment is usually in the fields, the packing houses or at the Foster Farms chicken processing plant.

“You either go to work and get paid, or you don’t earn that money,” he said. “Yes, our parents absolutely love their kids and want to take care of them. But if it’s a choice of food and clothing and a roof over their heads, the health problem is always going to come in fourth.”

It’s one reason that Livingston High School will soon be the first site in Merced County to have a school-based health center with its own primary care physician and behavioral health clinician.

“We have a lot of mental health issues, stressors from poverty,” said Calderon. “There are an inordinate amount of students with anxiety disorders that sometimes turn into full-blown panic attacks. These are the things we want to try to get addressed.”

In fact, Livingston High School makes three times the number of ambulance calls as the other high schools in the Merced Union High School District, and it’s the smallest school, with about 1,100 students.

Stakeholders Say Students’ Mental Health is a Concern

The idea for the center evolved last year when the district was working on its Local Control Accountability Plan. Part of the process is to engage a stakeholder group of parents, students, teachers, administrators and staff to determine the needs of the district.

“The largest area of concern was mental health and the overall wellness of students in our district,” said Tammie Calzadillas, assistant superintendent of educational services.

A local clinic that had an active relationship with the high school proposed a partnership. Livingston Community Health, a federally qualified health center, suggested a school-based community health clinic.

Calzadillas said she became convinced this was the direction the district should take after looking at several studies. “Overall attendance rates improve, the health of the family improves,” she said.

According to the California School-Based Health Alliance in Oakland, there are 231 school-based health centers in California. The schools usually provide in-kind contributions. The centers get reimbursed through private health plans, the Child Health and Disability Prevention Program, Family PACT and Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program.

Livingston High School will provide the facility, phone lines and parking spaces. Livingston Community Health will provide the services. “This is really about the overall health and wellness of students and taking the services to where the students and parents are,” said Leslie McGowan, chief executive officer of Livingston Community Health.

The on-site center is expected to be open part-time by late summer and running full-time within a few months if approval is granted by the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development.

“What this will do is provide another point of access to care,” McGowan said. “The needs of our community are definitely ones we feel equipped to address. We’re a 45-year-old organization here.”

Read the full article at California Healthline